Event Schedule

THURSDAY, MARCH 29:

CUNY GRADUATE SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM
219 W. 40th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY
(between 7th and 8th Avenue)

11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
STOLEN, directed by Violeta Ayala and Daniel Fallshaw
An examination of a complicated system of slavery in Western Sahara

12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.
THE PEOPLE THE RAIN FORGOT, directed by Sophia Tewa ‘09
An account of the debilitating effects of climate change in rural Kenya

2:30 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.
Short Films and Radio Documentaries from Liberia, England and Afghanistan, with a panel discussion featuring the filmmakers, including Almudena Toral ’10. Sponsored by the International Reporting Project.

4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.From YouTube to the Silver Screen, an educational program for NYC high school and CUNY students, journalists and filmmakers. Sponsored by the Harnisch Collaborative Future of Journalism Project and Baruch College. Dean Stephen Shepard delivers welcoming remarks.

AT DCTV
87 Lafayette Street

7:00 p.m. RECEPTION

7:30 p.m. LAS ABUELAS DE PLAZA DE MAYO AND THE SEARCH FOR IDENTITY produced by Dr. C.A. Tuggle
As many as 30,000 dissidents of the Argentinian military dictatorship were kidnapped, tortured and killed during the Dirty War between 1976 and 1983. A movement headed by a group called Las Abuelas de Plaza de Mayo, or the Grandmothers of May Plaza, is dedicated to finding their missing grandchildren, now in their 20s and 30s, who were taken from their mothers as babies and given to supporters of the military regime. This is an account of the grandmother’s movement and the grandchildren they have found.

8:30 p.m. – 9 p.m.  Interview with Dr. C.A. Tuggle, professor and director of the journalism program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.                              

******

FRIDAY, MARCH 30:

CCNY
Steinman Hall, Grove School of Engineering
160 Convent Avenue

6:00 p.m. RECEPTION SPONSORED BY THE CHANCELLOR’S OFFICE

7:00 p.m. – 7:10 p.m. TRANSMITTING HOPE: VOICES FOR PEACE IN SOUTHERN THAILAND, produced by Andrea Wenzel for WAMU’s Latitudes with reporting by Noi Thammasathien. In Southern Thailand an insurgency has quietly killed almost 5 thousand people since 2004.The conflict pits Malay-speaking Muslim separatists against the Thai state. Over the last 9 years violence has soured relations between Buddhist and Muslim communities. And it’s taken a heavy toll on women—who’ve lost family members and homes. This story was produced as part of an International Reporting Project fellowship.

7:10 p.m. – 8:10 p.m. THE WAR WE ARE LIVING, produced by Pamela Hogan and Oriana Zill
In Cauca, a mountainous region in Colombia’s Pacific southwest, two extraordinary Afro-Colombian women are braving a violent struggle over their gold-rich lands. They are standing for a generation of Afro-Colombians who have been terrorized and forcibly displaced as a deliberate strategy of war.

8:10 p.m. – 8:45 p.m.
PANEL: Impact of Afro-Latina women activists, featuring Oriana Zill and moderated by Linda Villarosa, director of the City College Journalism program.

******

SATURDAY, MARCH 31:

CUNY GRADUATE SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM
219 W. 40th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY
(between 7th and 8th Avenue)

12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.:
THE CARRIER, directed by Maggie Betts
A Zambian woman, one of three wives, contracts HIV and battles to protect her unborn baby from the virus in a remote village where few escape exposure.

1:30 p.m. Intermission

2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. NO WOMAN NO CRY, directed by Christy Turlington Burns
The powerful stories of at-risk pregnant women in four parts of the world, including a remote Maasai tribe in Tanzania, a slum of Bangladesh, a post-abortion care ward in Guatemala, and a prenatal clinic in the United States.

3:15 p.m. – 4 p.m. Panel moderated by Lisa Armstrong on maternal health issues worldwide.

4:15 p.m.- 6 p.m. Women and Children in Crisis: Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting Shorts Program. Featuring TOO YOUNG TO WED by Stephanie Sinclair on the phenomenon of child brides in Afghanistan, Ethiopia, India and Yemen; LEFT IN LIMBO, NEPALESE ADOPTIONS HALTED AND OUTLAWED IN PAKISTAN about rape and the subsequent “honor” killings of women and young girls, both by Habiba Nosheen; THE CLARINETIST about youth violence in Juarez and the healing power of music by Dominic Bracco and Susan Seijas; and current work from a collaborative reporting project between African and U.S. journalists on reproductive health in Liberia, South Africa, Nigeria and Kenya.  With a panel discussion featuring Nathalie Applewhite, managing director of the Pulitzer Center and award-winning filmmaker Habiba Nosheen.

6 p.m.—6:45 p.m. Reception sponsored by the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting.

7:00 p.m. – 8:20 p.m. A BITTER TASTE OF FREEDOM, directed by Marina Goldovskaya
In her quest to uncover the wrongdoings of the Russian authorities, Anna Politkovskaya inspired awe in some and fear in countless others. An investigative journalist for Moscow’s liberal Novaya Gazeta, she was often the only spokesperson for victims of the Chechen War. Hers was a lonely voice, yet loud enough for the entire country to hear. It was too loud. At age 48 she was assassinated for simply doing her job.

8:20 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. A conversation with Marina Goldovskaya

 

 

Photo Credits: www.123rf.com, alexbruda, seier+seier+seier

Comments are closed.